Escaping but then living

Written by Kathryn Lyons, PDA Associate Director


Throughout our lives we all experience highs and lows. We can feel trapped in our minds, bodies and spaces. Sometimes we choose an alternate reality to escape from what is happening in the world around us. Having personally experienced this, let me share a part of my journey.

I was born with a progressive and degenerative disability that impacted on my life in multiple ways. Initially, I was able to walk and physically capable of many things, as puberty hit my body changed so drastically; I ended up in a wheelchair. Learning to live with the complexities caused by the physical side of my disability became a new challenge.

This was a major life changing moment for me. For example, 12 years ago I could figure skate. Two years later, my body deteriorated to a level where I became bedbound, unable to transfer or care for myself independently.

I couldn’t understand WHY this was happening to me. Why, I had such intense pain. I was confused. I quickly went from a happy teen who would smile and talk to people into someone who felt trapped. Not only within my body, but isolated within the four walls of my room.

My confidence had decreased. I didn’t know who to turn to. Feeling like my whole world had crumbled around me, I started developing depression and I needed to find a way to distract myself quickly.

So, I got a computer and started living in virtual worlds, by joining alternate universes. I would game with them from across the globe on mass multi-player online games, instead of physically being around people. This online existence meant I could do anything, and it opened doors within my mind. It started to simulate the feelings of walking, dancing, and even figure-skating again. I had no restrictions and it was amazing! I could travel anywhere and in any time. I was losing my sense of reality.

For 7 years, I lived in these new worlds thinking I was happy, only really emerging when it was necessary. Over a period of time I started to realise that this was not healthy. I had to come to terms with the way my body had changed. Needing to grow mentally, this altered my perspective and reshaped my attitude around disability. My first steps were to accept myself and the freedom I could gain from my wheelchair. To achieve this, I had to leave my virtual life behind, by coming out of the shadows I opened my arms and embraced everything, rediscovering the amazing world that I was so afraid of.

Over the past 3 years, as I have built up my confidence, I have also been learning how to be a disability advocate supporting diversity and inclusion. Developing communication skills around public speaking and networking, I have strengthened my connections and now I’m building my businesses.

Through my networks, I was introduced to a representative of Physical Disabilities Australia (PDA). Joining PDA, gave me opportunities to meet with other members, where I learnt about their stories.

With PDA, I’ve realized I’m not alone. Discovering I could still do so many things, like race, dance, shop, socialize, work and travel. I was preventing myself from having an incredible life. Now with the roll-out of the NDIS, I aim to expand this and live to the fullest.

Every person has their own unique story and although we go through different journeys, we have something in common.

If you want to read more blogs like this one or find out what PDA does, please check out this website, follow them on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter.

Start to connect, as you will never know what you will find.

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